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Esophageal Cancer Screening

General Information About Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the esophagus.

The esophagus is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from the throat to the stomach. The wall of the esophagus is made up of several layers of tissue, including mucous membrane, muscle, and connective tissue. Esophageal cancer starts in the inside lining of the esophagus and spreads outward through the other layers as it grows.The stomach and esophagus are part of the upper digestive system.
The stomach and esophagus are part of the upper digestive system.

The stomach and esophagus are part of the upper digestive system.

The two most common types of esophageal cancer are named for the type of cells that become malignant (cancerous):

See the following PDQ summaries for more information about esophageal cancer:

Esophageal cancer is found more often in men.

Men are about three times more likely than women to have esophageal cancer. There are more new cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma each year and fewer new cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is found more often in blacks than in whites. The chance of developing esophageal cancer increases with age.

Smoking, heavy alcohol use, and Barrett esophagus can affect the risk of developing esophageal cancer.

Anything that increases the chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. People who think they may be at risk should discuss this with their doctor.

Risk factors for squamous cell esophageal cancer include the following:

Risk factors for esophageal adenocarcinoma include the following: