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Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

Reproductive System

Testicles

Testicular late effects are more likely to occur after treatment for certain childhood cancers.

Treatment for these and other childhood cancers may cause testicular late effects:

Surgery, radiation and certain chemotherapy drugs increase the risk of late effects that affect the testicles.

The risk of health problems that affect the testicles increases after treatment with one or more of the following:

Late effects that affect the testicles may cause certain health problems.

Late effects of the testicles include the following:

Ovaries

Ovarian late effects are more likely to occur after treatment for certain childhood cancers.

Treatment for these and other childhood cancers may cause ovarian late effects:

Radiation to the abdomen and certain chemotherapy drugs increase the risk of ovarian late effects.

The risk of ovarian late effects may be increased after treatment with any of the following:

The risk may also be greater in survivors who were age 13 to 20 years at the time of treatment.

Late effects that affect the ovaries may cause certain health problems.

Ovarian late effects include the following:

Possible signs of ovarian late effects include irregular or absent menstrual periods.

These symptoms may be caused by ovarian late effects:

Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. Talk to your doctor if you have any of these problems.

Fertility and reproduction

Treatment for cancer may cause infertility in childhood cancer survivors.

The risk of infertility increases after treatment with the following:

Childhood cancer survivors may have late effects that affect pregnancy.

Late effects on pregnancy include increased risk of the following:

There are methods that may be used to help childhood cancer survivors have children.

The following methods may be used so that childhood cancer survivors can have children:

Children of childhood cancer survivors are not affected by the parent’s previous treatment for cancer.