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Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Treatment

General Information About Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

 

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Extrahepatic bile duct cancer is a rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the part of bile duct that is outside the liver.

A network of bile ducts (tubes) connects the liver and the gallbladder to the small intestine. This network begins in the liver where many small ducts collect bile, a fluid made by the liver to break down fats during digestion. The small ducts come together to form the right and left hepatic bile ducts, which lead out of the liver. The two ducts join outside the liver to become the common hepatic duct. The part of the common hepatic duct that is outside the liver is called the extrahepatic bile duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is joined by a duct from the gallbladder (which stores bile) to form the common bile duct. Bile is released from the gallbladder through the common bile duct into the small intestine when food is being digested.Anatomy of the extrahepatic bile duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is part of a network of small ducts in the liver that collects bile. Bile flows into the right and left hepatic ducts which join together to form the common hepatic duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is the part of the common hepatic duct that is outside the liver. Bile flows through the extrahepatic bile duct and into the cystic duct to the gallbladder where it is stored. When food is being digested, bile flows back through the cystic duct and into the common bile duct where it is released into the small intestine.
Anatomy of the extrahepatic bile duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is part of a network of small ducts in the liver that collects bile. Bile flows into the right and left hepatic ducts which join together to form the common hepatic duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is the part of the common hepatic duct that is outside the liver. Bile flows through the extrahepatic bile duct and  into the cystic duct to the gallbladder where it is stored. When food is being digested, bile flows back through the cystic duct and into the common bile duct where it is released into the small intestine.

Anatomy of the extrahepatic bile duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is part of a network of small ducts in the liver that collects bile. Bile flows into the right and left hepatic ducts which join together to form the common hepatic duct. The extrahepatic bile duct is the part of the common hepatic duct that is outside the liver. Bile flows through the extrahepatic bile duct and into the cystic duct to the gallbladder where it is stored. When food is being digested, bile flows back through the cystic duct and into the common bile duct where it is released into the small intestine.

Having colitis or certain liver diseases can increase the risk of developing extrahepatic bile duct cancer.

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. People who think they may be at risk should discuss this with their doctor. Risk factors include having any of the following disorders:

Possible signs of extrahepatic bile duct cancer include jaundice and pain.

These and other symptoms may be caused by extrahepatic bile duct cancer or by other conditions. A doctor should be consulted if any of the following problems occur:

Tests that examine the bile duct and liver are used to detect (find) and diagnose extrahepatic bile duct cancer.

The following tests and procedures may be used:

Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options.

The prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options depend on the following:

Treatment options may also depend on the symptoms caused by the tumor. Extrahepatic bile duct cancer is usually found after it has spread and can rarely be removed completely by surgery. Palliative therapy may relieve symptoms and improve the patient's quality of life.